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Me right now.

Me right now.

(Source: weheartit.com, via realizes)

badlemonade:

Like I’m 10 years old all over again…

(via kateordie)


proseandpassion:
Le baron perché, a second-hand bookshop at Mirabel aux Baronnies, Drome, France.  Being located in a small village, I understand the owner survives on internet sales and only opens the shop in the tourist season. I was impressed by his modular shelf design …

proseandpassion:

Le baron perché, a second-hand bookshop at Mirabel aux Baronnies, Drome, France.  Being located in a small village, I understand the owner survives on internet sales and only opens the shop in the tourist season. I was impressed by his modular shelf design …

(via booklover)

everybodyreadingbooks:

I love sitting on the floor surrounded by books.

everybodyreadingbooks:

I love sitting on the floor surrounded by books.

(Source: lauranowlin)

kanadskiy said: I asked you awhile ago about ways to improve before going into a immersion environment, anyway now I'm here and I'm wondering (since I'm learning French) what all the "question sentences" (like est-ce que and the like) are and how to use them, since I can never get them straight and all the explanations I can receive are in French. Thanks!

whosaprettypolyglot:

I’m not entiiiirely sure of what you’re asking but I’ll have a go, let me know if I’m not right.

So est-ce que is almost like an auxiliary used in spoken/informal French to avoid having to invert the main verb in questions. So for example “Est-ce que tu as vu ce film ?” and "As-tu vu ce film ?" are literally the same question (“have you seen this film?”), but by putting the est-ce que at the beginning the rest of the word order of the sentence can stay the same and it’s therefore simpler.

You can combine this with basically any other question word for the same reason, to avoid the inversion later on, eg “Qu’est-ce qu’il a dit ?” and "Qu’a-t-il dit ?" (“what did he say?”) are the same, with the que (what) added to it. "Quand est-ce que tu sors ?" "Quand sors-tu ?" (“what time are you going out?”), "Où est-ce que tu vas ?" "Où vas-tu ?" (“where are you going?”) etc all work the same way, you just add the question word you want in front of the est-ce que

Basically if you’re speaking use est-ce que but if you’re writing an essay or anything use the normal inversion.

That help?

Men have scars, women mysteries.
George R.R Martin (via psych-facts)

Kit Harington photographed by Tomo Brejc for Esquire UK February, 2014

(Source: cyberqueer, via hanniballecters)

ethanwearsprada:

undeadcosmicunicorn:

Opaque Matte Lipstick - $6.99

these are exactly the lipsticks that white suburban moms and conservative talk radio hosts were worried about

(via altertheend)

daccodacc:

I laughed so hard no sound came out

(Source: iguanamouth, via coffeejazzandromance)

(Source: kirishii)

Me right now.

Me right now.

(Source: weheartit.com, via realizes)

badlemonade:

Like I’m 10 years old all over again…

(via kateordie)


proseandpassion:
Le baron perché, a second-hand bookshop at Mirabel aux Baronnies, Drome, France.  Being located in a small village, I understand the owner survives on internet sales and only opens the shop in the tourist season. I was impressed by his modular shelf design …

proseandpassion:

Le baron perché, a second-hand bookshop at Mirabel aux Baronnies, Drome, France.  Being located in a small village, I understand the owner survives on internet sales and only opens the shop in the tourist season. I was impressed by his modular shelf design …

(via booklover)

everybodyreadingbooks:

I love sitting on the floor surrounded by books.

everybodyreadingbooks:

I love sitting on the floor surrounded by books.

(Source: lauranowlin)

kanadskiy said: I asked you awhile ago about ways to improve before going into a immersion environment, anyway now I'm here and I'm wondering (since I'm learning French) what all the "question sentences" (like est-ce que and the like) are and how to use them, since I can never get them straight and all the explanations I can receive are in French. Thanks!

whosaprettypolyglot:

I’m not entiiiirely sure of what you’re asking but I’ll have a go, let me know if I’m not right.

So est-ce que is almost like an auxiliary used in spoken/informal French to avoid having to invert the main verb in questions. So for example “Est-ce que tu as vu ce film ?” and "As-tu vu ce film ?" are literally the same question (“have you seen this film?”), but by putting the est-ce que at the beginning the rest of the word order of the sentence can stay the same and it’s therefore simpler.

You can combine this with basically any other question word for the same reason, to avoid the inversion later on, eg “Qu’est-ce qu’il a dit ?” and "Qu’a-t-il dit ?" (“what did he say?”) are the same, with the que (what) added to it. "Quand est-ce que tu sors ?" "Quand sors-tu ?" (“what time are you going out?”), "Où est-ce que tu vas ?" "Où vas-tu ?" (“where are you going?”) etc all work the same way, you just add the question word you want in front of the est-ce que

Basically if you’re speaking use est-ce que but if you’re writing an essay or anything use the normal inversion.

That help?

Men have scars, women mysteries.
George R.R Martin (via psych-facts)

Kit Harington photographed by Tomo Brejc for Esquire UK February, 2014

(Source: cyberqueer, via hanniballecters)

nofatnowhip:

Louvre

nofatnowhip:

Louvre

(Source: nofatnowhip.com)

ethanwearsprada:

undeadcosmicunicorn:

Opaque Matte Lipstick - $6.99

these are exactly the lipsticks that white suburban moms and conservative talk radio hosts were worried about

(via altertheend)

(Source: decoratedskin, via srsly)

daccodacc:

I laughed so hard no sound came out

(Source: iguanamouth, via coffeejazzandromance)

"Men have scars, women mysteries."

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A master of none is better than master of one. After all, the saying says, "the more, the merrier," doesn't it?

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